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Photo Op Contest Winner

IN THE FIRST RUNNING OF OUR “PHOTO OP” CONTEST WE TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT WHAT DEFINES SPEED IN THE CYCLING WORLD.

Trek Madone SLR 7 Disc

Tom Peck purchased his Trek Madone SLR 7 Disc from us in September of 2019 and has made it a part of his everyday riding arsenal.

The 2019 model year for the Madone was groundbreaking from both an innovation and design standpoint. Aerodynamics, of course, were first and foremost on the list of factors that set Madone apart from the rest of the competition.

Shimano Ultegra Disc Brakes

The inclusion of disc brakes were a point of contention in the design of Madone. Many were concerned with how the caliper and disc would interrupt the airflow over the fork, and also with the added grams as compared to the more traditional rim brakes. Trek alleviated this issue by beginning to issue all models of Madone with flat mount disc calipers bolted to new KVF Aero shaped fork legs to help direct the airflow around the less aerodynamic, but overall better disc brake.

Shimano Di2 Crankset

Tom went with an Ultegra di2 build for the simplicity and lack of cables to keep maintained. Ultegra di2 has become a favorite among the local elite for its longer lifespan when compared to the higher end Dura-Ace, as well as its very similar electronic shift feel and customization. Di2 gives riders much more option over the mechanical group sets when it comes to customizing shifting. Options include “Synchronized Shifting”, which refers to the drivetrain shifting itself to a better gear combination when cross chained. For example, if a rider is in the large chain ring in the front and wants to shift to an easier gear in the back, the drivetrain will shift to a slightly harder gear in the back and will shift itself out of the bigger ring in the front to the smaller ring, which allows the drivetrain to last longer. Other options include changing the speed of shifting and integration with a Garmin cycling computer.

ISO Speed

Another defining feature of the new Madone is Trek’s own ISO Speed decoupler built into the frame. In previous generations of Madone, the ride was harsh, only reserved for the toughest of riders. Through research by bicycle manufacturers, comfort has been put higher up in the hierarchy than it has been in the past. The idea now is that a comfortable rider is a faster rider and this has been proven in both the pro peloton and the local Sunday morning group ride. ISO Speed in Madone is different than what comes in bikes like Domané. Instead of being strictly a rubber polymer in between the seat post and top tube, ISO Speed runs along the top tube in Madone, which not only allows for the aerodynamics to stay as functional as they can be, but also allows the rider to adjust the level of flex the frame has. If the rider wants to go race their Madone, they can make their ride more stiff and responsive. But if they are going out for an easy recovery ride, they can make their ride more forgiving without losing any of the other benefits Madone has to offer.

Tom has gone out of his way to purchase what has always been the pinnacle of cycling performance. This new iteration of Madone has taken what has made this bicycle so great and turned all of the factors up to 11. 

CHECK OUT THE GALLERY OF TOM’S BIKE BELOW AND KEEP A LOOK OUT FOR THE NEXT PHOTO OP CONTEST!

Front view of Tom's Trek Madone
Trek OCLV 7 Carbon
Bontrager Aeolus Pro Wheels
Trek Madone top tube
Headlight mounted to stem
Bontrager DuoTrap sensor
Tail light mounted to seat mast
Bontrager cycling computer